Liminal Podcast

On Holiday

May 18, 2020 Gordon Hall and Joe Pearson Season 1 Episode 5
Liminal Podcast
On Holiday
Chapters
Liminal Podcast
On Holiday
May 18, 2020 Season 1 Episode 5
Gordon Hall and Joe Pearson

This week Joe and Gord take you on holiday as they share stories from their travels around the world.

Show Notes

Check out this episode on YouTube!
Here’s a link to the photo Gordon was talking about.
The Silk Roads: A New History of the World - Peter Frankopan
You're a Miracle (and a Pain in the Ass): Understanding the Hidden Forces That Make You - Mike McHargue

Liminal Podcast is about dealing with change, be that through humour, self-care, science, or spirituality. Join Joe and Gordon as they laugh and ponder, as well as speak to experts and friends, trying to figure out how to deal with life when the rug has been pulled from under your feet.

We’d love to hear from you! If you want to get in touch click here.

Liminal Podcast couldn’t happen without the support of our team, as always massive thank you to Harry for writing the theme music, Haley for creating our logo and Leah for everything she does behind the scenes. Thank you to everyone who rates and reviews the show, we really appreciate it.

Subscribe to Liminal Podcast

Apple Podcasts
YouTube
Spotify
Stitcher

Follow us on social media

Facebook
Instagram
Twitter
TikTok

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/theliminalpod)

Show Notes Transcript

This week Joe and Gord take you on holiday as they share stories from their travels around the world.

Show Notes

Check out this episode on YouTube!
Here’s a link to the photo Gordon was talking about.
The Silk Roads: A New History of the World - Peter Frankopan
You're a Miracle (and a Pain in the Ass): Understanding the Hidden Forces That Make You - Mike McHargue

Liminal Podcast is about dealing with change, be that through humour, self-care, science, or spirituality. Join Joe and Gordon as they laugh and ponder, as well as speak to experts and friends, trying to figure out how to deal with life when the rug has been pulled from under your feet.

We’d love to hear from you! If you want to get in touch click here.

Liminal Podcast couldn’t happen without the support of our team, as always massive thank you to Harry for writing the theme music, Haley for creating our logo and Leah for everything she does behind the scenes. Thank you to everyone who rates and reviews the show, we really appreciate it.

Subscribe to Liminal Podcast

Apple Podcasts
YouTube
Spotify
Stitcher

Follow us on social media

Facebook
Instagram
Twitter
TikTok

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/theliminalpod)

Joe Pearson :

And we are back with Episode Five. I'm with Gordon once again.

Gordon Hall :

Yes, we are back Episode Five. Can you believe we're here, mate?

Joe Pearson :

Yeah, we're halfway to double digits, which is very exciting actually.

Gordon Hall :

I know. Yeah, it's, it's very cool. So it's a really exciting week this week in the Liminal podcast family. It's been a really special birthday.

Joe Pearson :

Yeah. Whose birthday was that? Gordon?

Gordon Hall :

Yeah, on Saturday, my father turned 58 or he is now officially an old man. Exactly. Happy birthday, dad. hope you had a great day. no one else's

Joe Pearson :

birthday for the week or so.

Gordon Hall :

Oh my god. Yeah, actually. Now you mention it. My Nan and my grandma's 80th and 88. We're both on Sunday. So yeah. I really hope that you both had a fantastic day as well.

Joe Pearson :

Yeah, happy birthday to them again asked the question. Nothing out of note this week. Maybe someone a bit younger, who had a little bit older.

Gordon Hall :

Well, actually now you mention it on Sunday. It's my mum's birthday. And she's also going to be 58. So Happy Birthday mum for Sunday. Again, super sorry that I can't be with you today. But should we get on with the show? Joe? I don't think there's any more birthdays that we need to get through or they're

Joe Pearson :

not gonna be rude. I know I'm getting a bit older. And I don't mean quite as much.

Gordon Hall :

Wait, there is one in your family isn't there? I believe it was your granddad's birthday on Saturday as well as on Happy Birthday Joe's granddad amazing. So you'll get on with the show. Yeah, yeah. And yeah, any other news that you've got Joe?

Joe Pearson :

Yeah. Turning 24 on Saturday as well. Obviously me my granddad share birthday, but

Gordon Hall :

I've forgotten to St. Joe. It's not all about you. Come on Happy Birthday for the other day. But let's move on to the rest of the show. Yeah, I mean, I'm happy to

Joe Pearson :

do it. I don't know if anyone relates but in your 20s and probably Even worse as you get even older, I really don't care for my birthday.

Gordon Hall :

Yet neither do we mate. Let's move on. So Joe, I apologise for that. That was a little bit rude of me obviously Happy Birthday for Saturday. Now we're recording this before your birthday actually happens so I don't we don't know what you got. But is there anything that you're hoping for this year to get as a present for your birthday? Yeah, I

Joe Pearson :

get asked that every single year I'm at that age now where actually want anything I really don't need to ask for it. And like when you're like six, yeah, you've got to wait for that little car you've had your eye on and toys r us for so long. I know. I normally just think of something on the spot. A bottle of whiskey or something. fairly simple.

Gordon Hall :

Nice. I don't

Joe Pearson :

like to put people out. I'm one of those kind of birthday people. I don't want the first

Gordon Hall :

no course. No, you're very humble.

Joe Pearson :

Of course. Yeah. I'm quite big headed. I do enjoy the day once it gets going. Once my birthday is underway, can be a bit of a knob Actually, I'll be honest.

Gordon Hall :

Okay. So other than turning 24 and becoming officially and Man if he'd been up much else this week, man productivity

Joe Pearson :

wise, what am I doing over then do nothing. I've done a bit of work stuff as of now you probably have as well. I bought a new book, which came a couple of days ago, which is really, really good. It's called the Silk Roads clues in the name of the book. Really interesting. Very big, big book, one of those that hardback books that like it's gonna take three books worth of space on a shelf. But yeah, it's about the Silk Roads. Okay, talking about Asia and how religion spread via the Silk Roads is really interesting.

Gordon Hall :

Yeah, no, I'm actually reading a book as well. I've I've gone the E book route, but downloaded one on my iPad, but it's a book called you're a miracle and a pain in the ass. Okay, yeah. opposite things. Yeah, it's basically a book all about our brains work and what makes you you from what I understand so far, but it's by Mike mahalik, who's an author and podcaster I've been following for a number of years now. He hosts a podcast called the litigious As well as another one could ask science might

Joe Pearson :

call. I mean, I guess it's looking at nature versus nurture. How much are we responsible for? Yeah, what's the environments responsible for that kind of thing.

Gordon Hall :

So far, he's gone into a lot of neuroscience. I'll let you know how it isn't finished at me.

Joe Pearson :

Nice. I will also give an update on this book. It's gonna take me probably a month or two, I don't know, singles with books for me if I'm into it, I will start reading it like two three hours a day. Yeah, I will really devote time to it. If not, I sort of just do a chapter once a week. And I slowly modely work my way through and then in about you, I don't like putting the book down and leaving it if I've read three chapters, be like a feel. I finish it. I'll just finish it even if it's rubbish. I am a chronic starter and never finish it with books. I've started about 300 books and probably finished about 30. Although

Gordon Hall :

Yeah, I'm very good at starting books and not finishing them. So who knows whether I'll actually finish this book, but it is by an author that I do like not probably stick out a bit more than some of the others. You will be shamed. Obviously if you don't carry This

Joe Pearson :

book goes to the ones yeah Have you been outside this week? Obviously your Boris our has now been extended to unlimited exercise you can travel anywhere in the country now.

Gordon Hall :

I know exercise there. Yeah, so I had a nice walk down to Cornwall yesterday. No kidding. I I've been running quite a bit gotten back into that, which is nice. And my friend Kate has also lent me a bike for a few days, which is quite nice. So I'm gonna get out on that and see whether cycling something I want to get into.

Joe Pearson :

Yeah, I've been cycling I think about three times this week. It's pretty good. Like you can go really long way and you don't feel absolutely knackered. Yeah, Haley your area is to be honest. Yeah. I mean,

Gordon Hall :

what's what's Lester like at the moment is it is it very hilly.

Joe Pearson :

Leicester is notoriously hilly, particularly where I live in West Leicester. It's just like, I literally live on a road that is just a hill we can see people out of our living room that are just like knackered on the way up the hill. No one is going on their bike up is too steep. We actually have a group of runners to probably not out at the minute but they come from flying past the amateur slash pro runners

Gordon Hall :

is that they're less than Road Runners or something.

Joe Pearson :

The less than blade runners who knows? Yeah,

Gordon Hall :

less than blade runners. Well, why don't you join them? Me,

Joe Pearson :

as we've discussed and I'll keep saying it. I am not built for running. I am at the minute I'm slightly too fat and I'm definitely too tall.

Gordon Hall :

Don't put yourself down like that. You can you can be a tool runner. Look at my Ferrer. I don't know if he's tall or not. I've never seen him. I know he's a runner.

Joe Pearson :

Pretty sure my fire is pretty small. Right? He's quite small. This is runner. He's like golden hold though. I don't I don't Well, that's Yeah. That's me.

Gordon Hall :

Right, but let's get on with the show. So Joe, why do you enjoy going on holiday?

Joe Pearson :

I mean, it's To time, I'm probably most relaxed. I'm never more relaxed than lying on a sun lounger doing absolutely nothing. Sometimes I'm reading a book just I just stare to the Abyss and have a little think.

Gordon Hall :

Yeah, I know. You mean, it's really nice to just disconnect from the monotony of day to day life to be somewhere different to kind of disrupt those routines. Get a bit of fresh perspective on life and stuff like that. I think we can all agree we will all be needing a holiday after the lockdown.

Joe Pearson :

Get away from your house a little bit. I mean, no one's probably been in their house. This amount of time since maybe when you were a kid. Even then you were trying your best every day to spend as much time away from that house.

Gordon Hall :

Absolutely. Yeah. Do you remember your first holiday? The first

Joe Pearson :

place probably ever went to would have been in Britain when I was very young. My mom and dad loved going to the seaside towns, particularly me and my sister were very young, I think Devin the form or Skegness Skagway

Gordon Hall :

Alaska. Yeah.

Joe Pearson :

Did you go to Butlins or would you go to Butlins. We went to haven holidays, I believe it was called, which is like the BS tech version of Yeah. Butlins similar kind of thing. Yeah. My mom hated it. We were essentially in a tiny little caravan. Yeah. My mom and dad had a double bed, which was fine. My sister had a bed to the side of them. And I was sleeping basically in the roof in the in the third bed, which when you're a kid, I was like, This is amazing. Yeah. But if I fell out, I would probably have died. Probably not allowed to do that anymore. No,

Gordon Hall :

probably health and safety is changed slightly in that respect. I wonder how many of the places that we went to when we were kids will be the way that they were. Then now I'm sure a lot it's change. Probably a lot. It's probably a lot

Joe Pearson :

more safeguarding. Yeah. And what I remember when I was younger, and there's a lot of random people floating around and particularly adults. Yeah. And the best thing about a holiday that's in your own country is probably the car right there. I used to love that because you know, you're slowly leaving your towns you've been in for so long. Even f&i mums just monotonous live at school and whatever when you young and then you eventually drive and then you you think you see the coast and they don't and then you think you see it again, you're constantly asking how far how far that's there normally that the times I got most excited as a kid

Gordon Hall :

driving games as well was so fun. Did you ever play yellow car?

Joe Pearson :

Of course, of course, I used to get told off because obviously involved hitting your siblings.

Gordon Hall :

Same but now Yeah, I I'm similar. I went on a lot of trips. When I was younger. We went camping quite a lot. There's a lot of fun. Well, I say a lot of fun. I probably enjoy it a lot more now than I did. Then. I complained a lot when I was a kid about camping. Especially the process of putting the 10 top and making sure it's clean. The inner 10 is not touching the outer 10 and all of that it was Yeah,

Joe Pearson :

yeah. Not from the idea of camping can often be better than the actual experience of camping. Yeah. I think once you get there and the weather's not quite as you pictured. It's a bit rainy, and you dad's in a mood. You know, no one else can be bothered. Yeah. And you just they're putting a peg in going, what are we doing here? We could be we could have gotten to Benidorm for the same process as well doing it.

Gordon Hall :

Exactly. Yeah. And I think the worst thing for me about camping is you go to sleep, and it's absolutely freezing cold. You've got loads of layers on and then you wake up, and it's blisteringly hot and you're sweating from every single orifice known to man. Yeah, pool of sweat every morning.

Joe Pearson :

Yeah, for me, you kind of grow out of the English holiday. I think when you're younger, after a little while, gets a little bit boring. You've kind of seen the same thing over and over again. And then when you get a little bit older, you then have kind of two styles of holidays. You have the beach holidays, when you kind of just go you relax, you switch off or you can go for the cultural holiday. Yeah, which can cause a bit of tension in the family when you got to walk around. And you don't really know where you're going.

Gordon Hall :

Yeah, my parents are big fans of the cultural holiday, and not big fans. of the beach holidays. So we went on very few beach holidays, when we were younger, it was a lot of the going round Berlin, looking at the Berlin Wall, going on walks, etc. and that kind of thing funny. I'm sorry that we went to Berlin a few years ago as a family when me like as me my sister as a kind of adult. And the highlight of the holiday was the fact that in every single bar or restaurant that we went to, my mom would order a beer, take a photo of it and change her facebook profile picture to that beer.

Joe Pearson :

It's the most middle aged thing I've ever had absolutely complete with, like a great britain flag in the bottom right corner to support whatever cause is going on at the time.

Gordon Hall :

Yes, absolutely, you know, beer flavour in Asia.

Joe Pearson :

Yeah, my parents had a similar approach. even weirder, I think, actually, I asked my mom about this the other day, because I knew I was gonna do a podcast on this. Now, basically, we used to do home exchanges. It's as simple as it sounds. All you do is you agree to someone else around the world, they stay in your house, you stay in their house. And that goes for pets, cars. literally anything you have is fair game. Pretty much. Wow.

Gordon Hall :

Okay, so how old were you? With all of this was going on?

Joe Pearson :

We started when I was about nine or 10. And the first one we ever did. We went to San Francisco for about three weeks. Amazing.

Gordon Hall :

Wow. What did you do in San Francisco? Then where were you staying there?

Joe Pearson :

in San Francisco? We stayed in what's known as the lesbian gay area. Oh, yeah. Super halion. Quiet kind of middle class, huh. And we stayed in this lovely lovely house like proper American style three story house. You have massive massive kitchen and everything. Now, we have two old piece of cars really. One of which was this Cadillac that had oil just floating in the front of it. The other thing was this like big saloon car.

Gordon Hall :

Wow. Okay. What did you do while you were in San Francisco, then

Joe Pearson :

In San Francisco, we I was only about 10. I kind of remember it. I kind of don't. Yeah. Now the thing was these home exchanges is the neighbours obviously. No, it's all going on because they kind of keep an eye on you. But they also look after you and tell you where to go, what to avoid that kind of thing. So we went over there for the first night was quite an experience. Me and my sister have a lot of memories of these American kids. Oh, which were, I will say a little bit weird. They're a little bit weird. Yeah, they were kind of fascinated with British culture and stuff to the point where we just nodding our head going Yeah, that's true. Yeah, that's right. Yeah.

Gordon Hall :

Okay. Did you get to experience much American culture?

Joe Pearson :

Yeah, quite a lot. We pretty much get a bus ride out of the area. We were in to wherever, basically, yeah. And America and Britain is very divided. Hmm. different classes and different groups tend to stay in different areas, particularly in San Francisco. All right, okay. We would get off the bus and this would be like a Hispanic area. And it would just stink of weed and like, not clearly not much money in the area and we'd kind of get back on the bus and go, I don't think there's much here for the kids. Yeah, we go to the next area and so on and so right. Okay,

Gordon Hall :

so you're staying in the gay and lesbian area. You said Yeah. Yes. So were you how swapping with a gay or lesbian couple or were they just is this that's the area that they happen to live in.

Joe Pearson :

They weren't a gay couple. No, but they were both I think there were teachers and professionals. So yeah, they were a bit more open minded.

Gordon Hall :

Okay. I was in San Francisco A few years ago, actually, myself. I went just after my 22nd birthday. It was my first big holiday by myself. I'd essentially just been made redundant by the job that I was in. And with the money that I got from the redundancy. I decided to go to California for a few weeks. So I, I went, yeah, so I landed in LA. I stayed there for about a week and got to see the app. I actually got a personal tour of the Warner Brothers MUSIC Studios and then I did the big group tour of the film studios, which was really cool. I got to see like the set the friends was filmed on, and I got to sit on the friend's couch with no friends. And I got to, as well see a lot of the recording studios where a lot of the big Warner Brothers artists have recorded out and saw loads of Batman records on the wall and stuff like that, which was super cool. The highlight of San Francisco and LA for me, actually, was Uber. I don't know if you've used Uber in the states before.

Joe Pearson :

No, not at the time. That's how we had a rusty old cotton land that we contrived around.

Gordon Hall :

Yeah, I guess it was probably not around them, but in in the state. So ubered had been around a little bit longer than it had been in the UK and the drivers just took it so much more seriously than we do here. You know, you get into a car and they'd have little thing of mint. They'd have a like a cooler with a load of bottles of water in it. They had snacks available, like Got Oreos from one of them. I got issues alcohol Joe, they took it very seriously and looked after you in a way that I never seen in the UK and it definitely made me change the criteria for which I gave a five star rating and Uber for a long time. Sure, yeah. Was it were they more expensive generally or for what you could work out was about the same. So the the actual main fares were a little bit more expensive, but they just introduced Uber pool over there. I think I mentioned a couple of episodes ago on the what I tell the truth, you when I lied that I'd gotten an Uber pool with James Corden. I didn't get it with James Corden, but I did use Uber pool quite a lot. It was $5 for anywhere in the city. So it was pretty reasonable that

Joe Pearson :

night. Did you meet any interesting American folk?

Gordon Hall :

I had a debate with a girl who was a couple of years younger than me. She She was about 20 I was 22 we were in a bar and we were debating about gun rights, which was very interesting. Okay, I'm guessing she maybe was for your again. Yeah, she was for I was against and we couldn't understand each other's point of view for the life of us. It was very, very strange. What was la like?

Joe Pearson :

Obviously I experienced San Francisco Actually, I found the people are really friendly actually really, really friendly. Yeah,

Gordon Hall :

San Francisco was, as he said, very friendly, very laid back very chilled. La was a completely other story. It was busy. It's absolutely massive. It's like five times the size of London. And yet the public transport infrastructure is absolutely awful is worse than Leicester. I don't know how bad Leicester is just

Joe Pearson :

not very big. So it's not the one to be honest. Yeah,

Gordon Hall :

that public transport system was absolutely awful. But the the actual city is incredible. I definitely recommend seeing I stayed a bit on the east side of town. I got to see things like the Grammy Museum. I got to walk down the walk of fame as well, which was quite cool.

Joe Pearson :

Is that where all the celebrities have got their placards on?

Gordon Hall :

Yeah, absolutely. All of the little stars. I saw Kermit the Frog. Probably others that I saw. I can't remember them.

Joe Pearson :

Yeah, like to America in particular food at the age I was I was a grown boy. Yeah, so the portion sizes were insane. A breakfast meal was something we wouldn't even have at dinner.

Gordon Hall :

Yeah, I mean, while I was in the States, I have to confess I went to the Cheesecake Factory, I think about eight times in seven days. Wow. And a lot of cheesecake.

Joe Pearson :

And we almost didn't actually get to go to America. We cut it really, really fine. I don't know about you, but my parents are really strict in terms of timing. So they want to get to the airport every four hours before just in case of traffic and things like that. Yeah. We were on our way to Heathrow about four hours before and we got hit with the worst traffic I've ever seen. Oh

Gordon Hall :

my God,

Joe Pearson :

we were in gridlock you know when cars are just not moving. Yeah even just got out the cars like what the hell is going on? Oh, major accident everything like that. about two hours passed and we had about Two hours for the flight was due to leave, and we had an hour to get to check in. My dad, he did go within the speed limit. He was like, teetering on, you know, on the speed limit, and we got there in time, just left the car wherever we could in the carpark and we were actually the last people to be allowed to get on this flight. Because obviously a lot of people got caught in this traffic jam. Yeah, everyone was trying to queue in, and they literally got to the desk. My dad just showed the passports and they're like, we're gonna board this flight in a second. Yeah. And they shoot the dogs behind us. And about 2030 people behind us didn't get on the flight.

Gordon Hall :

Oh, my God, that's, that's stressful. I cannot stand flying. For that reason. It stresses me out so much the stress of like, Oh, am I going to make this fly? What time do I have to be at the gate? I hate it. I always try and arrive as early as I can so that I don't have to kind of deal with that stress myself.

Joe Pearson :

I'm not a very patient person either. I hate carrying a hain. waiting around for stuff. I always think things should be done done instantly and so flying in that whole experience I find so yeah, a very bored

Gordon Hall :

Well, I have a confession to make I am I suffered very badly with travel sickness and when I went to Uganda I on the way there was sick five times on a seven hour flight.

Joe Pearson :

Was it turbulence or was it

Gordon Hall :

just I think it was turbulence and I think by the by the fourth or fifth time it was just my body was just it was just not well, they had to give me an injection it got so bad. Oh, my God.

Joe Pearson :

I mean, I've been on a lot of flights with a lot of turbulence. I think I'm on the way to America, or I might be on the way back. We've got really bad turbulence really, you know, they have to shut the lights off. Yeah. And the plane, keep feeding it drop dramatically. And there's people just screaming I think at one point actually on the flight back to America. Yeah. I think it was around the time. I don't think it was the Florida storm but it was some kind of big storm that was impacting the world. Yeah, the actual mass dropped down at one point and it made people scream

Gordon Hall :

that I would not have been okay on that.

Joe Pearson :

I'm really weird in situations like that, dude, do you like it? I don't like it. I'm fine. I know it's out of my control. Are you gonna die right here now I die.

Gordon Hall :

Are you one of these people that can watch a movie about a crashing plane while you're flying on a plane?

Joe Pearson :

I'd be more than happy to do so. That was the latest release. We had good reviews short weirdo. I've just realised I completely glossed over the fact that you said you went to Uganda. Tell me why. And I flew in Uganda is this when you called the head of a chicken? Like you said a couple of episodes ago.

Gordon Hall :

Yeah, I didn't pull the head off. Just FYI. I cut it off. Not that strong.

Joe Pearson :

It's not that much better

Gordon Hall :

now. I say now, but yeah, no Uganda. So we were on a youth group trip. So we were working in kind of project building a community sensor type thing for the local area. But while we were there, we got a of the slums, that the project that we were working on were supporting. That was incredibly eye opening, and definitely stayed with me some of the stuff that I saw there.

Joe Pearson :

What kind of things did you see? I mean, obviously, this is probably poverty stricken. Yeah, a bare bones kind of community.

Gordon Hall :

Yeah. So we got to see a lot of schools. We saw the education happening there. We got to know the kids. And that was really cute. The kids were absolutely adorable. The really sad thing was though, because there was so many kids, we didn't really speak the same language as them. So recognising them, it was quite difficult to tell them apart the first few days because there were so many of them. But over a few days, I came to realise that the easiest way to tell all of these kids apart was the fact that they were wearing the same clothes every day. So these kids had only one outfit. They were living in absolutely awful poverty.

Joe Pearson :

How did they make money? Do they have any kind of export or are they just living to eat?

Gordon Hall :

Yeah, so the biggest export of the community Unity was bootleg gin, which was incredibly dangerous. It could make people go blind and all of this kind of stuff, but it was made using cane sugar and water. And that would involve a lot of basically burning the cane sugar and avoiding it and creating the alcohol. But there was a lot of waste products that went into that. So as we were walking around, we'd see these massive pools of this black kind of oily liquid with kids just kind of walking around next to it. And we heard stories about falling in and stuff like that. It was very uncomfortable to see.

Joe Pearson :

I'm guessing highly illegal.

Gordon Hall :

Yeah, but there wasn't really anyone that it kind of enforced that probably the funniest thing that happened in the whole of Uganda was on the safari

Joe Pearson :

is is the typical Safari on the back of a dodgy kind of a Land Rover that's got three wheels. Yes,

Gordon Hall :

absolutely. Yeah. So we went there for about three days. It was a place called Murchison falls National Park is in Uganda, but it As parts of Congo and Kenya as well, the first night that we were there, we were camping. And we were told by the people at the campsite that any food that we had on us, we had to hand into the bar, because there were wild animals that walked around the campsite. And if they smelled the food, they might try and get into our tent. And there was a lad on the holiday that we were on. And I'll call him any changes named protect his identity. And so we're calling Kenny, and he was the Taurus or snacking. One evening after everyone had gone to bed mean a few of the others who are a little bit older was just staying up at the bar just having a chat. And we noticed that there was a hippo walking around the campsite, and hippos I don't know if you know much about hippos, Joe. They are considered one of the most dangerous animals in the wild. Yeah, they kill a lot of people. Yeah. It's not intentional, but because of how big they are. If they run out you then they could potentially kill you. So Kenny As we said, as I said, he was known for having a lot of food on him. And we knew that he had some peanut butter in his bag that we were pretty sure that he hadn't given into the bar. He was asleep in his tent. We didn't really know. All we saw was this Hippo sniffing around his tent, sniffing around and we were following it, like, kind of excited because oh, it's like a hippo in the wild following it off terrified that he was going to kill Kenny, that was absolutely hilarious. The next morning when we told him and he was like, oh, didn't overdo problems. So Kenny survived.

Joe Pearson :

Yes, sr, but I did.

Gordon Hall :

Yeah. So yeah, Joe, you said the UFC went to San Francisco. Was that the only home exchange that you did?

Joe Pearson :

No, we did a lot of I think we did it for about seven or eight years, from the age of about nine and 10 till about 1718. Okay. I asked my mom about this. I mentioned earlier about why we even did this. And apparently she seen a programme on the television, whether we're doing home exchanges and talking about experiences and stuff and she mentioned It's my dad thinking he say no. And he went, yeah, let's do it. Let's try it.

Gordon Hall :

Wow. Okay, so it was one of those things where she says it almost as a joke, and then is I oh crap. Okay, it's actually happening now. How does it organise? Is it pre internet? I'm guessing

Joe Pearson :

No, this is in the internet boom. Oh, this is the internet kind of got started. Oh, of course. Yeah, you're younger than me, aren't you? I am a bit younger. I'm not fair to web dial up internet, which is absolutely. state of the art at the time was very slow. But yeah, essentially, all that happens is you go on this website and you register your house with pictures, a little description if you've got cats or rabbits, I think that we had at the time, so people were fully aware of what they're getting themselves into. And then all you do is you put the dates on that you can do a home exchange, and it will match you with people. And you can pick where in the world you want to go. Or you can just leave it to the system and it will say potentially, you could swap with this person. And I think we were approached by these people. In San Francisco, these people in San Francisco decided that we're going to come to Leicester in the UK for three weeks. Now, a lot of you might turn the nose up for that the reason that people used to really like our house was the fact that it was fairly big, wasn't like massive, massive, but it was a nice British big house. But it's also less than is in the middle of the country. Yeah, I can get to London in two hours, you can get to Manchester in two hours, you get to Wales in two hours. So you can pretty much do all of the stuff that you want to do in the UK in a couple of weeks. Yeah.

Gordon Hall :

So Leicester is actually probably one of the best places to live in the UK is what you're saying. I'm

Joe Pearson :

tired, kind of. It's the best. It's the best place to live in the UK. If you want to leave Leicester on a regular basis. It's not bad, which is the key thing

Gordon Hall :

that that is true. Yeah.

Joe Pearson :

Not Birmingham. There we go. Yeah. When it was proposed to us, me and my sister, of course, we were just like, yeah, yeah, let's do it. We're up for anything. But what would normally happen is we wouldn't get told until about a week or two where we were going right? Because it was all kind of up in the air, there was a lot of things that depended on people with where you'd have to arrange if someone was going to hand the keys to you, wherever you're going to leave the keys with the name and that kind of stuff. So, about a week before we went to San Francisco, I think it was about two weeks before we were going to go that we decided we were gonna go to San Francisco, which was pretty insane way to do a holiday. Yeah. Kind of last minute affair.

Gordon Hall :

Yeah, I mean, how did that work with flights and stuff?

Joe Pearson :

You just find the cheapest airport cheapest flight. I mean, especially for going to America. It's going to be expensive regardless. Yeah. Um, you're gonna spend a good three 400 quid at least on flights per person. Yeah, of course. We went to some amazing places. And we went to Denmark twice, which is really interesting. We went to France a couple of times. We went to Belgium. We went to these amazing I think we had to Northern Ireland ones for a week. And like we won our first Yeah. Which were probably one of the worst ones actually, because it just rained. It just rained for a week.

Gordon Hall :

That's such a shame. Belfast. Northern Ireland is such a lovely place to go. I've been there few times and is one of my favourite places to go. Probably not as a kid. But the stuff that I got up to in Northern Ireland. I don't think I'd have been able to do when I was a kid. So

Joe Pearson :

yeah, I wasn't capable. We were Yeah. So we were kind of stuck in this house in Northern Ireland. They had a Nintendo 64 with Mario Kart on it. So I think I pretty much played that non stop and merited every single race on that. Yeah.

Gordon Hall :

Nice. Yeah,

Joe Pearson :

that. But the home exchanges for me were, I didn't really realise at the time, but they were really important in my upbringing, I think. Because you gotta remember, this is not a normal holiday, you're getting completely immersed in the culture. You're swapping houses with someone in the middle of a normal neighbourhood in that place you're in, you know, and sometimes it wasn't great, because people wouldn't be that welcome. But most of the time they were. What other neighbourhoods Did you go to them probably the most kind of different so on that we went to we went to Denmark the first time and we went, it was kind of in the middle of nowhere, but it was quite poor. area Denmark. We're in quite a kind of almost a council flat equivalent. Yeah. In demo. I don't think they have council flats. It was very cheap. It was like a tower block. And yeah, that was probably one of my favourites are still quite young. I think I was about 12 at the time we went to there. Yeah. Obviously at that time we were going out and doing stuff, but sometimes we weren't. So I would just go out like a normal kid would and the neighbour Yeah, I'd make friends with these people that spoke little to no English. We pretty much communicate via football talk nice, to be honest. Okay. They would shout Rooney or whatever the football star was at a time and I would sort of go Yeah, and I would name their star. And my best memory actually, from that holiday. I was out with these kids and I befriended the Somali kids that live there. And we we I borrowed a scooter that we had in the flat, and I was playing, I was doing something on my scooter was gone. It was gone. So I said to the Somali kids, I was pointing to their scooter and going, I was just kind of making hand gestures to say mine's gone. Yeah. And they went Follow follow in a kind of broken Danish accent. And we had to go up to these big Danish kids that were probably like 1718 smoking. Yeah, on the playground and I could see my scooter in front of them to me and the Somali kids who are about the same age as me, we had to go in there snatch the scooter and run. So all I remember is those scootering away. Yeah, the 1718 year old Danish kids chasing us back to the flat and then my mum and dad. Why are you out of breath? I don't think I told them. I'll be honest. I thought I would be in trouble for losing the scooter.

Gordon Hall :

Wow. Well, you've heard it here. Now mom and dad person.

Joe Pearson :

I've spoken like this numerous times. And now they're fully aware that they know No, right? But yeah, these experiences I had, particularly from a very young age really develop confidence. And that really got over the boundaries of talking to different people, and learning how loads of other different cultures live.

Gordon Hall :

Yeah, but that must Very strange, that kind of culture shock and stuff like that being different cultures just just on culture shock and experiencing the the differences and stuff like that while we're in Uganda, some pretty serious stuff started to happen in the UK. And it really brought the culture shock home for us in a really, really, really real way while we were in Uganda, and it was during the time of the 2011 riots after the death of Mark Duggan. And if you remember that time, Jay

Joe Pearson :

kind of forgot. But yeah, I do remember that that kind of sprung up all around the country was really weird, actually, that Yeah,

Gordon Hall :

so it all kicked off while we were in Uganda. And maybe a day or two before we came back. We were all in an internet cafe. We saw the news. We actually saw two piece of news, we saw the news that Amy Winehouse had died and that hit us really hard. And then we saw the news of all of these riots and we actually arrived back in the UK as they were kind of at their peak. And I remember being absolutely shocked and appalled at the what was going on in our country having come from such an area of poverty and seeing such, you know, shocking scenes to then come back and see people my age, you know, because I mean, the riots started from a, an understandable place, it was a reaction to the death of Mark Duggan, but it got a lot worse and people kind of took it as a way just to cause trouble and people were, you know, breaking into shops, and stealing packets of rice and all of that kind of stuff, I think was the big thing. But I remember the media hit really hard personally because I used to have drum lessons at a music store in Croydon, and that music store got destroyed and set fire to during those riots. And so coming back to hearing all of this stuff and hearing that, you know, my the music store that I spent quite a lot of time at and probably would have been in around that time had I Not going to Uganda was absolutely shocking and appalling.

Joe Pearson :

Yeah, when you experience another culture, and particularly not the best part of it, it really opens your eyes up to the fact that we're really lucky. We live a really good life and quite comfortable at times.

Gordon Hall :

Yeah. But also, I think we we take so much for granted. And actually, I, for me, I think that there was so much that I saw in Ugandan culture that I saw as valuable that we didn't have in Britain, and we kind of forgotten and we didn't appreciate because we've got such a privileged position that we're in. So it's definitely something that hit me hard in that. Yeah.

Joe Pearson :

In this country. We're very lucky in the fact that we can be very self sufficient. Yeah. We often can survive ourselves without the need of others to a certain extent, and obviously in poverty and things like that. You have to bind together of it. Because if you don't, you're going to fall by the wayside for sure. Absolutely. One of the places and countries that I really liked and I continue to like his heart And the Netherlands. Yeah, a base. I went to twice on home exchanges. And I've also been to Amsterdam a couple years ago as well. Amazing. I just find the people the culture, very similar to Britain in some ways. Yeah, I think way more events and a lot more open minded.

Gordon Hall :

Yeah. For sure. What parts of the Netherlands Did you visit and other than Amsterdam?

Joe Pearson :

I think it's called the Hague. Yeah. Can area kind of middle Netherlands, I believe. Yeah. It's quite nice. Quite a feeling. It's got a bit more money in some of the rivers and Netherlands but it's really nice. Nice. It's just so flat. You can just cycle everywhere.

Gordon Hall :

Yeah, I went to Amsterdam a few years ago. And while we were there, I really wanted to get a bike. But the day that we'd set to go cycling around the city, ended up being the day that it just rained all day. So we decided against it in the end,

Joe Pearson :

that when I went out we actually went for my birthday a couple of years ago. We got bikes on the second day, and it is chaos. I remember my friend Rami, we just got the bikes and we all had it. out, and rahmi almost got ran over on the first corner of the road, really. And that set us up for the day. And we thought we're gonna have to be really, really careful because there's a lot of bikes and there's a lot of people and a lot of cars. Yeah, yeah. But Amazing. Amazing. What about you? What did you get up to in Amsterdam?

Gordon Hall :

Wow. So we actually we went to Berlin first and then we got a coat over to Amsterdam. And we probably arrived at about 4am. So our hostel that we were staying in wouldn't let us in until about two, we had quite a bit of time to kill between getting kind of off of the coach to kind of checking into our hospital. So we decided to explore a bit of the town and we're walking down the street kind of from the bus station down through Amsterdam we find ourselves in the red light district. I don't know if you got to see any of the red light districts while you were there. Me.

Joe Pearson :

Yeah, we walked through once or twice. Yeah, it's one of those things. It's really weird, but you kind of feel like you have to do it while you're there is something you've never seen before.

Gordon Hall :

Yeah.

Joe Pearson :

Well, what time was it while you were there? Um, I believe we when one night when it's quite late, I think about 11 ish, which was like peak time, which was really weird, because it was people going in and out and stuff. Yeah. And I think we went early evening as well. Okay.

Gordon Hall :

Well, I have to tell you, it's a very different place at four o'clock in the morning, it was probably one of the most desolate scenes that I've ever seen. We're walking down this absolutely empty street. There's litter strewn all over the place you see kind of condoms on the floor and stuff like that. But it's completely dead. We don't see a single other soul. And as we're walking down the street at the end of the street, we can see in a short window, this face and as it as we're walking closer and closer, it's getting bigger and bigger and bigger. I'm just going to send you a picture of the face that we saw Joe, and we'll put it in the show notes as well. But this was the first face that I saw in Amsterdam.

Joe Pearson :

Yeah, it's more of the penis memorabilia. Yeah, it seems to be done. everywhere around Amsterdam. Absolutely.

Gordon Hall :

Yeah, we saw that and then we turned a corner and we saw a shop that had a load of what they called condom toppers and which were little figures that you put on the end of a condom, like animated figures and they had the entire cost of The Simpsons, which was a bit strange considering the Barton laser and an eight respectively, but a and yeah, then a load of other creatures as well. And at the time, I was really good friends with a girl called Josie who was obsessed with pandas. And I thought it would be hilarious to see whether I could get her on a condom topper. Unfortunately, they didn't have any but I went into about how the Simpsons

Joe Pearson :

but not a panda Yeah,

Gordon Hall :

but I went into the store and I actually asked whether they had a panda condom topper and I got a very strange look from the assistant and

Joe Pearson :

I don't think a man running a shop that sells condom toppers should really be questioning people. No class really No, I didn't kind of set your stall out. Yeah. Did you happen to stumble across the sex Museum in Amsterdam? We didn't know. We we heard about it, but we didn't get to go to it. Unfortunately, we heard about it after we've been. We went okay for euros. Yeah. Which is pretty cheap things in about a capital system. It's a capital city. Yeah. Yeah, it's exactly as described. It's just got weird sex things and things that move. I actually actually got paid a little prank on in there. Now, people have probably seen the photos of people hugging the kind of penis when they were in Amsterdam. Yeah, I've seen that on Instagram and stuff. Now next to that is three seats. So you can sit down. That's quite tired. been walking around all day. I sat in the middle of the seat. Yeah. Now, you're not meant to do that. Because you instantly get hit from underneath the seat with a pretend penis. And you essentially get bombed. Oh, so you basically get prance I was sat there and it took a couple Have turns to work out what was happening. Yeah. And there is these random foreign people just looking at me laughing. Wow. Obviously all my friends as well trying to record it as quick. Yeah. So yeah, I got bombed my chair in the sex museum. That's,

Gordon Hall :

that's amazing. I wish that everyone could see the gestures that you're doing to describe This to me is it's quite visual the way that you're gesticulating at the moment, Joan. It's, I feel like we should maybe make that a video for people to watch or something. After Tick tock, you just

Joe Pearson :

made me do I think I'm well and to rest. No. Any kind of sexualizing of my body.

Gordon Hall :

That's that's fair enough. Curious. Fair enough. So Joe, if you've been on any holidays that aren't home swap? Yeah, the last few holidays

Joe Pearson :

have been I've not really got home at the minute. I'm a renter. I'm probably not really allowed to swap that with someone from another country. Yeah, not sure that's in the tenancy agreement? Probably not. No. The last time they went on was to Turkey. Oh, which was insane. About a year and a half ago and it was incredibly hot it was 40 degrees Yeah. Which for a man of my complexion just ruined me on the first day.

Gordon Hall :

Yeah, I've been to Turkey as well and it is very hot there I think we went in about February time but even that was blipping boiling.

Joe Pearson :

What did you do? Their mind was basically like an all inclusive drink nice. Do nothing. Yeah, basically.

Gordon Hall :

So I don't know if you've seen in a magazines but they advertise these coach holidays where you kind of get on a coach and you get taken around to different hotels, a lot of older couples do them.

Joe Pearson :

Yeah, my grandma and grandpa. Yeah. did that for about twins? Yes. They've been on every coat family available. Yeah.

Gordon Hall :

Well, my dad decided to book us one as a family when I was about 2324. My sister was about 21. We went on a coach holiday of Turkey it was it was very nice. Actually. We there was a couple of other younger people on the trips and me and my sister. got to know them, which was nice. But one of the funniest things that happened, we were staying in this very nice hotel. And they had a spa there. And me and my sister decided that we wanted to get this kind of Turkish spa experience out of interesting. So we go there. And we were under the impression that we can get it on our rooms, like on our room bill. So our parents would pay for it. We don't have to tell them and it would be fine. And so we get there. And the first thing that they tell us was, and the guy says, Oh, yes, you need like, shorts or something. And I stupidly mistook that and thought that he meant underwear. So I'm stood there in my underwear, having this Turkish bath and they're like, putting water on us and like this, like scrub putting model over our bodies, and you meant to be in your swimming trunks. And I'm just there in my life is very strange. But anyway, we have all of these different treatments. It takes probably about to three hours. And then when it comes to pay, they're like, Oh, no, you can't put it on your room, you need the money. So me and my sister go up, and we asked our parents whether they could give us the money for it because we didn't have any cash with it. And my parents were like, No, of course not like, you're adults. Now you can pay for this yourselves. And so we will like, share what we could do. We don't have any cash on her. I had my bank card. So I went to the girl, do you have a Can I pay by card? I was like, No, no, don't pay by card. I'll take you to a cash point. So I have to get in this strange Turkish man's car dry for about 20 minutes to the next town. He then watches me as I get a cash cow after get about 100 pounds worth of cash out or whatever, and then hand it to him and he drives me back. And I think all of the stress that I lost in the spar experience I then got back afterwards

Joe Pearson :

Tell me Yes, cash is king cash is absolutely

Gordon Hall :

yeah, but that was that that was definitely a Anything experience

Joe Pearson :

that my highlight attackee was when we went to the town outside the hotel, and it was just full of shops were just ripping off every brand you've ever seen. You can get an Armani cap for 20 quid, yeah, you can get all but there are quite good fakes I'll give it to them. I kept looking at everything like the Louis Vuitton bag and stuff and I was like that is a Louis Vuitton banner. I'm sure there's a lot of people that go there, buy all that stuff, and then just go back and no one is none the wiser. Yeah,

Gordon Hall :

yeah, I mean, when I was last year, actually, I was in my mind with my sister. And the markets there were a similar story you need go and you'd see you know, like Roy bands and sunglasses or like Gucci but spelt with a CH or something. And it was, it was very funny. But the weirdest thing I think that happened to me in my mind, I don't know if you've been to kind of that part of Asia before. I know you reading a book on it, but remind me of where my mouth so it's what used to be called Burma. So it's kind of in between India and China and it's a combination of their cultures and the road to Mandalay the Silk Road is I think, what some of your book is,

Joe Pearson :

is the name Yeah. Yeah. The names parts of a few times. Yeah.

Gordon Hall :

And but while we're there, we got to see kind of quite a lot of the country. But the weirdest experience was seeing a film mass made my sister went to see Ant Man and The Wasp, and in the cinema, you go in, it gets a dead cheap, it's about three quid to see the film popcorns about 50 P. But while all of the trailers are showing, suddenly, the flag of my mom appears on the screen, and everyone around us start standing up. We kind of look around, we're like, oh, we better stand up and then they start singing the national anthem in the cinema. Oh my god, I film me my sister. Just tradition. I think so. Yeah. But it was very strange. We were just kind of standing there and we'd seen like, not in the cinema, but in the area. There's a, you know, military with guns and Stuff like that. So that I think there is a as a sense of, you know, you've got to another state and stuff like that. So out of a fear of being shot or anything, we stood up and we joined in with this national anthem, but it was proper weird. And then you say

Joe Pearson :

joined in. There's no way you knew what this national anthem was that we just trying to copy the people around, basically. Yeah.

Gordon Hall :

But it was it was very fun. And then, you know, in Marvel films, how they have their post credit scenes afterwards and stuff, and usually hate that.

Joe Pearson :

Yeah, I mean, we'll we'll talk about another time. I hate that. Yeah,

Gordon Hall :

cuz you have to sit there through the whole credits. Well, yeah. Yeah, go see the film.

Joe Pearson :

I don't care who made it. Sorry.

Gordon Hall :

Go see the film in Miami because they skip past all of the credits and just show you the end credits scenes straightaway after the film

Joe Pearson :

is I need to get myself to a military dictator. Yeah, basic. I probably saw all of these little pet peeves,

Gordon Hall :

indeed. Absolutely. And but while while we're in Weimar, as well as that we we got to experience some really good Cool stuff. We went on a three day trek through the, through the mountains, we got to stay in some local homestays in a monastery. But after we got back from that track, we arrived in this place called inlay Lake, which is an area kind of in central Mayan Mar. And we were told while we're there that there was a really great place to get a local tattoo there like a traditional tattoo. And so we we've seen this online and stuff. So we go to where it's advertised, and it's this guy's front room. He doesn't speak a word of English, you kind of go in and you sit down, he calls around and you find someone to translate for you. And then shows you these are very old tattered books of designs, and you kind of go through and you look and you kind of pick one that you like the look of and the the guy who's translating tells you the story of it. And then he kind of agreed to have the tattoo so me and my sister both agreed to get tattoos done. Sorry, dad. I know you don't know about this, but yeah, hey, you know now we've got tattoos.

Joe Pearson :

My dad's not a fan of going away. But I don't think any dad is a fan of tattoos other than a dad with tattoos. Exactly.

Gordon Hall :

Yeah. But so the the tattoos It was a traditional stick and poke style. So he has this big long kind of metal rod, which is pointed on the end. And then he has this ink that's made out of coal and charcoal. And he's the

Joe Pearson :

same as doesn't sound very safe.

Gordon Hall :

So he sterilises the needle in a rice cooker, which is hilarious. And then Okay, he kind of sketches out a couple of he doesn't draw out the design on you or anything like that. He just does a couple of points like a couple of exes have kind of reference points, I guess. And then he just starts and the pit The, the needle is probably about the size of a pool cue. And he's he's there with it kind of over his shoulder. And he's kind of moving it kind of like a like you're lining up a pawn shop, essentially but poking someone in the okay and he does that For the whole design is going round with no guide, nothing just literally by as I poking it with this massive rod, and it ended up coming out. And I don't know if you can see it on the camera.

Joe Pearson :

From what I can make out, it looks like a child has drawn a dragon.

Gordon Hall :

So it's a traditional design. And it's a combination of a lion and a man's face. It's called the chin. And the chin is a figure that you see in my mind at the entrance to all of the temples. The story behind it is actually quite an interesting one. I don't think it's a true story. And you'll see why as I tell it, but the tail goes that there was this princess who lived in a castle, and one day she went out into the forest and she fell in love with a lion. He married the lion ended up having a baby with the lion and the lion got quite violent after this and so the princess left the lion and the lion just kind of raged through the forest. fact that he'd lost his son and he was just this angry lion kind of raging through the forest, and the sun goes up. He then kind of hears about this lion raging through the forest and goes out and slays the lion.

Joe Pearson :

And this is this is not half lion, half man. He grows up as

Gordon Hall :

he grows up as a man, yeah. But he goes, Okay, and then he goes into the forest and he slays the lion, he comes back and he says to his Mom, look, I slayed the lion. And she's like, son, that's your father. And out of the kind of the shame of the fact that he killed his father. He made a statue of the chin outside the temple, as a sign of respect, and that's why there's these gyms, outside temples, and they are a sign of wisdom and of power and protection, which is why I got it.

Joe Pearson :

I don't want to sound disrespectful. The The only part of the story is the guy immediately believes his mother says, Oh, sorry. That's my dad. I'm so sorry. You didn't question the mother say if I remember the lion that sex with it. thing. Yeah goes along.

Gordon Hall :

I feel like maybe there's some kind of message in the mythology that's getting lost in translation in our culture, potentially,

Joe Pearson :

Brian know, the claiming of woman in a lion have been in love together and had a baby. Scientific scientifically think we can prove that probably didn't happen. I mean, maybe it was a man with long hair man would have to maybe own gold. Maybe perhaps. Maybe it was just for some reason. You went on all fours, like a lineman and stuck a tail to his bottom. I don't know. I don't know.

Gordon Hall :

Maybe the princess was Carol Baskin. Perhaps Yeah,

Joe Pearson :

I see an option. Perhaps the lion is Howard Baskin, where he's posed Maybe, yeah, in that photo on the beach,

Gordon Hall :

maybe? I think you're kind of coming on from what we were talking about last week and know this concept of liminal that we've taken with this podcast and holidays are a liminal place that we go to You know, quite often you can go on holiday and come back a completely new person, your perspectives might have changed, because you're able to kind of disrupt the day to day, and maybe shed some of those ideas that you've kind of become attached to. It's a great way to kind of reset and have a fresh start, I think. I'm sure you agree.

Joe Pearson :

Yeah, definitely. Yeah. And hopefully we can all do it soon. That's Yeah, gonna be the key thing result?

Gordon Hall :

Absolutely. Yeah. I mean, there's nothing quite like the feeling of coming back from holiday. I don't know if you've ever experienced I used to experience it always. When I was a kid, we'd be coming back from holiday driving back from either the airport or wherever we come off the motorway. And we'd be driving through our local town and you'd notice certain things that have changed, like a shop will be rebranded or there'll be the you know, that family has moved house or there's a new car out or something like that. And you'd notice all of these things that have subtly changed from when you first went on. Hold on, if you you remember that experience growing up?

Joe Pearson :

Yeah, for sure. Yeah. Especially as a kid in the back of the car. Yeah.

Gordon Hall :

And it's a quite a relieving kind of experience, I think, to kind of come back to like, Okay, back to real life. What am I going to leave behind? And what am I going to kind of take with me forwards back into the real world? So yeah, Joe, we've been around the world. And now we're back in the UK. I believe you've got some good news to take us into next week.

Joe Pearson :

Yeah, this is from my dad. Now in our local area, community is banded together and there's actually a massive WhatsApp chat of every single house pretty much in the area. Wow. Now, what people have been using that for is people that are vulnerable people that need a handle certain things. Just put some message in there and invariably someone will help you out. Yeah. My dad's helped a couple of people out with a bit of shopping and things like that. Yeah. It's just a nice show of community spirits.

Gordon Hall :

It's like the local community banding together to support one another. That's fantastic.

Joe Pearson :

Pretty much. My dad said he's never experienced anything like it. And they've lived here for over 2324 years since I was born. Right. Wow. They've never felt anything like that. But you said the one thing that hopes is that this continues on that group doesn't get deleted. And if people in the local neighbourhood need help with anything again, he hopes are still there. Amazing. That'll happen a lot. We don't know yet. But it's certainly an opportunity. And I'm sure this is probably the only place where this is happening, I suppose. quite nice. And there's a few really vulnerable people in not far from here who some people have clearly given a lot of help to. Yeah, via the internet. Definitely. And we'd love to hear if anyone else has got any stories like that of people coming together in your local communities and doing stuff To support the people that are vulnerable, we'd love to hear from you if you've got any stories like that, so that we can share it. Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. So yeah, next week, we're going to be doing a desert island. It's not really Desert Island Discs. Is it Joe? Is desert island. Something else? Yeah. Well think of a windy night. Yeah. As we tend to come up with. But yeah, we're going to do some favourite items, favourite foods, some pretty interesting things. I know, Gordon's got a certain tastes, shall we say in terms of the arts?

Gordon Hall :

Yes. We'll go with that. Yeah. So yeah. Well, we'll see you next week, then. it's goodbye from me. And bye for me. See you next week. Bye. So a massive thank you again to Harry for providing the music that you can hear here. And thanks again to Haley for making our logo. And Leah for just being absolutely fantastic behind the scenes making sure all of this happens. And finally a massive thank you to you for listening. We've had loads of great reviews and ratings on Apple podcasts keep them coming in special thanks to broken toy one for your comment really meant a lot. We're just going to read out now it says love these to keep me going through lockdown great chemistry and bro to work to thanks Gordon and Joe, thank you broken toy, and anyone else who's listening. If you drop us a review, or rating it will be massively appreciated. We'll see you next week. Thank you